ANIMAL DIVERSITY OF INDIA

ANIMAL DIVERSITY OF INDIA

The Red data book

Q.) What is it?
The Red Data Book is the state document established for documenting rare and endangered species of animals, plants and fungi as well as some local sub-species that exist within the territory of the state or country. This book provides central information
for studies and monitoring programmes on rare and endangered species and their habits.
It is a loose-leaf volume of information on the status of many kinds of species.
This volume is continually updated.

Q.) Who issues this book?
Issued by – International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) located in Morges, Switzerland.
1st issued in – 1966

Q.) What does it do?
It contains information for endangered animals and plants.
Information for mammals and birds are more extensive than for other groups of animals and plants, coverage is also given to less prominent organisms facing extinction.
Pink pages in this publication include the critically endangered species. As the status of the species changes, new pages are sent to the subscribers.
Green pages are used for those species that were formerly endangered but have now recovered to a point where they are no longer threatened.
With passing time, the number of pink pages continues to increase. There are pitifully few green pages.

IUCN classification of conservation priority

Q.) Who is IUCN?

International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) is a
membership Union uniquely composed of both government and civil
society organizations. It provides public, private and non-governmental
organizations with the knowledge and tools that enable human
progress, economic development and nature conservation to take place
together.
The organization is best known for compiling and publishing the IUCN Red List, which assesses the conservation status of species worldwide.
Headquarter – Gland, Switzerland.

Species are classified by the IUCN Red List into 9 groups, set through criteria such as rate of decline, population size, the area of geographic distribution, and degree of population and distribution fragmentation.

IUCN classification of conservation priority

1. Extinct (EX)

No known individuals remaining.
When there is no reasonable doubt that the last individual has died.
A taxon is presumed Extinct when exhaustive surveys in known and/or expected habitat, at appropriate times (diurnal, seasonal, annual), throughout its historic range have failed to record an individual.

2. Extinct in the Wild (EW)

Known only to survive in captivity, or as a naturalized population outside its historic range.
A taxon is presumed Extinct in the wild when exhaustive surveys in known and/or expected habitat, at appropriate times (diurnal, seasonal, annual), throughout its historic range have failed to record an individual.

3. Critically Endangered (CR)

Extremely high risk of extinction in the wild.
A taxon is Critically Endangered when the best available evidence indicates that it meets
any of the criteria for Critically Endangered.
Criteria
Reduction in population (> 90% over the last 10 years),
Reduction in Population size (number less than 50 mature individuals)
Quantitative analysis showing the probability of extinction in wild in at least 50% in their 10 years)
It is therefore considered to be facing an extremely high risk of extinction in the wild.

4. Endangered (EN)

If it meets following criteria –
Criteria
Reduction in population (> 70% over the last 10 years),
Population size estimated to number less than 250 mature individuals)
Quantitative analysis showing the probability of extinction in wild in at least 20% in their
20 years)
It is therefore considered to be facing a very high risk of extinction in the wild.

5. Vulnerable (VU)

If it meets the following criteria – Criteria
Reduction in population (> 50% over the last 10 years),
Population size estimated to number fewer than 250 mature individuals)
Quantitative analysis showing the probability of extinction in wild in at least 20% in their 20 years)
It is therefore considered to be facing a very high risk of extinction in the wild.

6. Near Threatened (NT)

A taxon is Near Threatened when it has not qualified for Critically Endangered, Endangered or Vulnerable now, but is close to qualifying for or is likely to qualify for a threatened category in the near future.

7. Least Concern (LC)

A taxon is Least Concern when it has not qualified for Critically Endangered,
Endangered or Vulnerable or Near Threatened
.
Widespread and abundant taxa are included in this category.

8. Data Deficient (DD)

Not enough data to make an assessment of its risk of extinction.
Data Deficient is therefore not a category of threat.
Listing of taxa in this category indicates that more information is required and acknowledges the possibility that future research will show that threatened classification is appropriate.

9. Not Evaluated (NE)

A taxon has not yet been evaluated against the criteria.

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